Back chaining a Trick and Latent Learning

Have some clicker fun with your dog tonight!

Comments

the simplicity with which that just happened was brilliant! I loved that the dog was not pressured or rushed and figured this out. I also never saw anything like "back chaining" at least not that I was aware of. I am a fan.

For some unknown reason I cannot see the original post. or maybe it was a video and my home dial-up doesn't handle those.

But Karen Pryor explained "back-chaining" many years ago in Don't Shoot the Dog, which I read the year it was published and being sold in the (human) Psychology section.

Not every trick or sequence can be back-chained because you have to be able to get that last part of the sequence to occur by itself and be rewarded enough that the student really comes to enjoy doing it and look for oppertunities to do it . then teach the next to last part and teach student that doing that next to last part creates the oppertunity to do the very last part and get the desired reward.

Some things are hard to back-chain, because it could be impossible to do a later part without having already done an earlier part.

Shaping, the teaching by gradual aproximation to the desired result, can be done in any case.

Knowing how fast to go with a student so student doesn't feel unpleasantly pressured or rushed but also doesn't feel bored to death is part of what makes training an art as well as a technical skill.

Your ability to describe with concise simplicity & train at the same time is

wonderful. A rare talent!

the simplicity with which that just happened was brilliant! I loved that the dog was not pressured

Elvinia